Entries by drcraigharrison

EP #121

Erin Bowerman on Learning from Failure, Challenging Entrenched Beliefs, and Developing Strong Young Dancers



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Erin Bowerman (@dancestrength_nz) is a movement specialist working in dance. She holds a Masters Degree from AUT University, where she carried out her research at the Australian Ballet School in conjunction with High Performance Sport New Zealand looking at the risk factors for overuse injuries in elite adolescent ballet dancers.

Erin works as a strength coach for the New Zealand Dance Company and the New Zealand Youth Ballet Company. From 2016-2018, she was based in London where she coached at the Royal Ballet School White Lodge and the National Centre for Circus Arts.

In this conversation, Erin shares her story of personal dancing failure to transformation in dancer development.  Please enjoy the show. Kia ora!

Connect with Craig:

Instagram: instagram.com/drcraigharrison/
Facebook: facebook.com/drcraigharrison
Twitter: twitter.com/drcraigharrison

Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotifyor your favourite podcast platform.

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EP #120

James Mortimer - Speed Kills



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 James Mortimer (@jamesmortimernz) is a former national hurdles and sprint athlete, having represented New Zealand at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne, Australia.

James now coaches a group of some of our fastest athletes, including Zoe Hobbs, who recently ran 11.08 seconds at the Athletics World Championships in the US to set a new New Zealand record. He also works at Diocesan School for Girls in Auckland where he manages day to day operations of a portfolio of sports from Year 7-13 level.

As James puts it, “speed kills”, and in this conversation, he shares his approach to developing it. 

 

Connect with Craig:

Instagram: instagram.com/drcraigharrison/
Facebook: facebook.com/drcraigharrison
Twitter: twitter.com/drcraigharrison

Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotifyor your favourite podcast platform.

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EP #119

The Curious Mind with Austin Einhorn - Awareness, Building Rapport, Important Questions, Austin's New Course, and More



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Coach, writer, educator, pioneer in skill acquisition and deliciously inquisitive guy Austin Einhorn (@apiros.team) rejoins me for another episode of The Curious Mind.

In this one we discuss being a reflective coach, building rapport with your athletes, important questions to develop your awareness, parenting, Austin’s new course and much, much more.

If you enjoy the podcast, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. It takes less than 60 seconds and really helps us keep producing the show. We also love hearing your feedback!

Follow Craig:

Instagram: instagram.com/drcraigharrison/
Facebook: facebook.com/drcraigharrison
Twitter: twitter.com/drcraigharrison

Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotifyor your favourite podcast platform.

Help youth athletes THRIVE. Sign up for your weekly dose of inspiration and insight now!


EP #118

The School of Shred with Tom Willmott



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Tom Willmott (@tomwillmott) is the head coach of the park and pipe program at Snow Sports New Zealand. Tom leads a team of coaches that looks after ~20 athletes from the very elite, including winter olympic gold medalists Zoi Sadowski-Synnott and Nico Porteous, to 11 and 12 year olds in the national development programme.

Tom is a former snowboard competitor and national champion, has a Professional Doctorate in Elite Performance, a Master’s degree in Physical Education and a Bachelor’s degree in Sports Coaching.

In this episode we discuss:

  • Tom’s deep connection with the mountains;
  • The feeling of ‘flow’ and why Tom loves to chase it;
  • Month long summer holidays camping and traveling though Europe as a kid;
  • Coaching and studying all over the world;
  • The evolution of snowboarding;
  •  How to coach risk-taking;
  • Designing learning environment to optimise progression;
  • The School of Shred
  • Tom’s reflective practice; and
  • More.

Connect with Craig:

Instagram: instagram.com/drcraigharrison/
Facebook: facebook.com/drcraigharrison
Twitter: twitter.com/drcraigharrison

Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotifyor your favourite podcast platform.

Help youth athletes THRIVE. Sign up for your weekly dose of inspiration and insight now!


EP 117: Jamie Salter

Jamie Salter on Managing Growth-Related Injuries (Ep 117)



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Jamie Salter (@jay_salter) is a researcher and senior lecturer in sport science and Injury at York St John University where he delivers theory and practical based sessions to undergraduate and postgraduate students in the areas of injury prevention, rehabilitation and strength and conditioning.

Jamie is also an accredited Strength and Conditioning coach and Sport Scientist and has worked in physical preparation roles with youth and adult athletes at Barnsley FC, Middlesbrough FC, York City Knights RLFC and GB Goalball. 

Jamie’s PhD, which dig into in our conversation, investigated how biological maturation impacts responses to training load and injury in adolescent football.

We also cover:

  • Developing rapport;
  • Jamie’s coaching and teaching philosophy;
  • Development versus performance;
  • Balance; 
  • The problems with too much structure;
  • And much more.

Please enjoy the show.

If you enjoy the podcast, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. It takes less than 60 seconds and really helps me keep producing the show. I also love hearing your feedback!

Sign up for Craig’s free weekly newsletter by scrolling down. It’s full of research-backed, practical ideas for helping youth athletes defend against injury, overtraining and burning out.

Follow Craig:

Instagram: instagram.com/drcraigharrison/
Facebook: facebook.com/drcraigharrison
Twitter: twitter.com/drcraigharrison

 

Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotifyor your favourite podcast platform.

Help youth athletes THRIVE. Sign up for your weekly dose of inspiration and insight now!


EP 116: Shaun Matthews

Shaun Matthews on Having a Coaching Philosophy, Performance vs Character and Developing Self-Reliant Learners (Ep 116)



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On the show today I chat with Shaun Matthews, Community Coaching Advisor at Harbour Sport.

We dig into:

  • The importance of a coaching philosophy;
  • What Shaun has learnt about talent;
  • Coaching mindset;
  • Developing self-reliant learners;
  • Balance; 
  • And much more.

Please enjoy the show.

If you enjoy the podcast, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than 60 seconds and really helps me keep producing the show. I also love hearing your feedback!

Sign up for Craig’s free weekly newsletter by scrolling down. It’s full of research-backed, practical ideas for helping youth athletes defend against injury, overtraining and burning out.

Follow Craig:

Instagram: instagram.com/drcraigharrison/
Facebook: facebook.com/drcraigharrison
Twitter: twitter.com/drcraigharrison

Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotifyor your favourite podcast platform.

Help youth athletes THRIVE. Sign up for your weekly dose of inspiration and insight now!


EP 115: Vince Minjares of Developing Better Youth Coaches

Vince Minjares on Developing Better Youth Coaches (Ep 115)



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Youth sport coaches are undervalued.

In this conversation, Dr Vince Minjares (@PlayerLearning) tells us why and how we can go about changing it.

Vince leads game and coach development at Harbour Basketball, on the North Shore of Auckland, and holds a PhD in Coaching and Pedagogy.

Please enjoy the show.

Kia ora!

If you enjoy the podcast, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than 60 seconds and really helps me keep producing the show. I also love hearing your feedback!

Sign up for Craig’s free weekly newsletter by scrolling down. It’s full of research-backed, practical ideas for helping youth athletes defend against injury, overtraining and burning out.

Follow Craig:

Instagram: instagram.com/drcraigharrison/
Facebook: facebook.com/drcraigharrison
Twitter: twitter.com/drcraigharrison

Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotifyor your favourite podcast platform.

Help youth athletes THRIVE. Sign up for your weekly dose of inspiration and insight now!


EP 114: Jamie Taylor on Giving and Receiving Feedback

Jamie Taylor of Giving and Receiving Feedback (Ep 114)



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Feedback is not just about what is said but what is heard.

In this conversation, Jamie Taylor (@JTGreyMattersUK) tells us more.

Jamie is a senior coach developer at Grey Matters, an evidence-based organisation that consults across a wide range of sports to raise their game. Prior to this role, Jamie coached at Leicester Tigers for 7 years, developed coaches at the English Institute of Sport and taught school children. 

Jamie holds a PhD in Coaching Science and professional qualifications in teaching, coaching and mentoring. His research interests are coaching, talent development and coach development and he shares his insights at conferences across the world.

In this conversation, Jamie and I discuss his latest research on feedback and how to use it to enhance the way your athletes learn. 

Please enjoy the show.

Kia ora!

If you enjoy the podcast, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than 60 seconds and really helps me keep producing the show. I also love hearing your feedback!

Sign up for Craig’s free weekly newsletter by scrolling down. It’s full of research-backed, practical ideas for helping youth athletes defend against injury, overtraining and burning out.

Follow Craig:

Instagram: instagram.com/drcraigharrison/
Facebook: facebook.com/drcraigharrison
Twitter: twitter.com/drcraigharrison

Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotifyor your favourite podcast platform.

Help youth athletes THRIVE. Sign up for your weekly dose of inspiration and insight now!


Influences on Feedback

Influences on Feedback

Written by Dr Craig Harrison

Navigating a rapid increase in sporting and life demands is a critical feature of a young athlete’s success. Receiving feedback from coaches, parents and supporters is a core way of doing this. The challenge is deciding who to listen to. As a young athlete progresses, the number of feedback sources increases. They’re subjected to a range of views and pressures all offering different guidance and advice. How can a young athlete make sense of it all? And what can we do to help?

Let’s start by understanding the elements of feedback a young athlete uses to assign value. There are many such elements but the 3 big ones are the perceived status of the person providing the feedback, how much the feedback provider is liked and trusted, and the athlete’s sensitivity to difference in the feedback.1

Let’s go a little deeper…

Perceived Status

How much control an athlete thinks you have over their sporting future determines how intently they’ll take notice. Do you have a strong history playing the game? Have you got a winning record? Do you coach the team an athlete is trying to get into? If you answered yes to any of these questions you’re more likely to be listened to! What’s also interesting is parents who fulfil a dual role as coach and parent at earlier stages of development are trusted more, especially if they play the game or did so previously.

A Close and Open Relationship

Athletes value feedback more when they like and trust you. While unsurprising, it’s worth thinking about this more deeply. Are you trustworthy? I’ve found a lot of success in my coaching and parenting by using these 4 principles of trust to guide my behaviours.

  1. Be compassionate – Do I listen? Do I show empathy? Do I recognise and celebrate others?
  2. Act with integrity – Am I honest? Do I keep my word? Do I have clear values that guide my decisions?
  3. Display consistency – Do I show up in a way that is predicable? Can I be counted on? Do I make fair and impartial decisions?
  4. Show competence – Do I know my job? Do I pursue mastery? Do I help others?

A Sensitivity to Difference

Rather than critically reflecting on what’s being said, young athletes typically base their decisions on how difference the feedback is from what they’ve previously heard. When your idea or suggestion doesn’t relate well to prior knowledge or understanding, it’s often rejected. This is important for two reasons; 1) an athlete’s past experiences heavily influences what feedback they value, and 2) when introducing new ideas, how you do it is critical!

So, a quick recap – young athletes typically judge the value of your feedback on the status they perceive you have, how much they like and trust you and how different your feedback is from what they already know and believe.

Be aware during coaching and parenting conversations, influences of feedback significantly impact whether or not your messages are valued and, therefore, how quickly your athletes learn and develop.

If you’d like to learn more about my public talks and workshops, including how to give great feedback, get in touch here.

I’ll see you next week,

Craig —

References

  1. Taylor, J., Collins, D., & Cruickshank, A. (2021). Too Many Cooks, Not Enough Gourmets: Examining Provision and Use of Feedback for the Developing Athlete, The Sport Psychologist (published online ahead of print 2021).



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Panning for the Year Ahead

Planning for the Year Ahead

Written by Dr Craig Harrison

As we approach the end of the summer holiday and our kids return to sport for another year, a lot of time and energy is about to go into planning. A recent conversation I had with one of my athletes focused on exactly that; he asked “what should I do and when should I do it to best prepare for the upcoming football season?”

To begin with, maybe a word of caution:

Awareness Drives Action

Imminent games, tournaments and competitions can lead to much training without a clear understanding of what actually determines performance. I don’t like this approach so much. A belief that “more is better” is fairly typical in the minds of coaches, parents and young athletes with big goals in sport. You will know you are doing it when just putting the work in becomes more important than what type of work is being done. Instead, help your athletes move towards a place of understanding. What actually influences performance? Getting clear on this first means the work being done will be much more likely to have the impact you are looking for.

So, now a way to better help your athletes.

Say Less, Notice More

To react by doing is human. To take away the pain, fix the problem, or make the road traveled by our kids less fraught with struggle. Yet when we do, we miss the chance to learn, and thus be of greater help and guidance. We respond based on what is true to us at the time, on what we think and have previously experienced. But it’s impossible to know it all. Expand what you know by taking the first moment just to observe. What do you notice? Why might you be seeing it? Then, rather than responding with an instruction, get curious. Read up. Ask for help. Listen carefully. Seek to understand what is truly responsible for the goals your athletes are wanting.

And now, perhaps a way to take action:

Ask Considerate Questions

There is a subtle aspect to learning often neglected. The learner’s perception of events (not yours) is what affects change. It’s easy to attribute a behaviour you see to a particular way of being. For instance, the mistakes made on court are the result of a lazy work ethic in practice. But judgements are often misguided, and thus dangerous. So the question is – how best to help? I like using a simple framework based on Bloom’s taxonomy for learning1.

  • Remembering – What took place during the game/competition? What surprised you about what happened?
  • Understanding – What was important about what you did/noticed today?
  • Applying – What could you do with what happened today?
  • Analysing – What did you do differently today? Did you see any patterns in what you did today?
  • Evaluating – How well did you do today? What did you learn about your strengths and areas where you can improve?
  • Creating – What could you do next? What specific steps can you take to overcome your challenges? What do you need help with?

This framework is a hierarchical order of cognitive skills that, when combined with ‘considerate’ questions from you, can help athletes make sense of their own experiences. It also helps you understand what your kids need to keep learning.

So happy New year… 2022 will be full of opportunities to help your athletes learn and develop. Curious, resourceful and resilient young people is something that the world needs more of right now than ever before.

I’ll see you next week,

Craig —

References

  1. Anderson, L. W., Krathwohl, D. R., Airasian, P., Cruikshank, K. A., Mayer, R. E., Pintrich, P. R., . . . & Wittrock, M. C. (2013). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives (abridged edition). Harlow, UK: Pearson Education.



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